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Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

Latest Resources

Environmental Polling Roundup - September 23rd, 2022

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
09-23-2022

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new polling on permitting reform, the Inflation Reduction Act, and electric vehicles.

Times/Siena Poll: Democrats Buoyed by Abortion and Trump

Lisa Lerer and Nate Cohn. New York Times
Research & Articles
09-16-2022

More education about the Inflation Reduction Act is needed in order to bolster public support for it. New polling by the New York Times and Siena finds that voters are split roughly evenly on the Inflation Reduction Act when they aren’t provided with any details about it (37% support / 32% oppose), while new polling by Navigator finds that voters support the bill by an overwhelming margin after reading a brief description of its major provisions (64% support / 26% oppose).

Environmental Polling Roundup - September 16th, 2022

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
09-16-2022

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new polling about the Inflation Reduction Act, message testing about renewable energy, and new polling about climate change and extreme weather.

Environmental Polling Roundup - September 9th, 2022

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
09-09-2022

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new polling on the Inflation Reduction Act, attitudes toward the country’s major domestic energy sources, and a new paper on the behaviors and perceptions that correlate the most strongly with changes in climate attitudes.

Supporters of the Inflation Reduction Act are winning the public debate over it, but still need to help the public understand what’s in the bill. Polling on the Inflation Reduction Act has been very consistent in showing that Americans support the bill by wide margins when provided with even basic information about what’s included in it. New polling by Navigator further demonstrates that support for the Inflation Reduction Act has held steady as voters have grown increasingly familiar with it, though there is still ample room to raise awareness about what the bill covers. Two-thirds of voters (67%) support the Inflation Reduction Act after reading a brief, one-sentence description of it.

Research & Articles
09-02-2022

Wind and solar remain Americans’ most favored energy sources, while support for nuclear energy continues to trend steadily upward. Americans are far less likely to blame gas for pollution and climate change than other fossil fuels. 77% of Americans say the United States should be spending more money over the next few years on the research and development of wind and solar energy. 76% of Americans recognize that oil contributes to unhealthy air pollution and climate change. 73% of Americans recognize that coal contributes to unhealthy air pollution and climate change.

Michigan and Wisconsin voters widely support the Inflation Reduction Act and want more climate action on the state level. Additionally, large majorities in both states want to see their state expand clean energy and Wisconsin voters prefer a gubernatorial candidate who prioritizes climate change, pollution, and clean energy by a two-to-one margin over a candidate who doesn’t prioritize these issues. Michigan voters support the Inflation Reduction Act by a 64%-27% margin. 66% of Michigan want the state to produce more energy from clean energy sources such as wind and solar. Wisconsin voters support the Inflation Reduction Act by a 65%-29% margin. 65% of Wisconsin voters want the state to produce more energy from clean energy sources such as wind and solar. By a 62%-31% margin, Wisconsin voters prefer a gubernatorial candidate who prioritizes climate action, reducing pollution, and expanding clean energy over a candidate who doesn’t prioritize these issues.

Environmental Polling Roundup - September 2nd, 2022

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
09-01-2022

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including a new 19-nation survey about climate change, new national polling on climate acton, new polling about the Inflation Reduction Act in Midwest battleground states, and a novel new survey of video gamers’ attitudes about climate change.

Research & Articles
09-01-2022

Majorities of Americans label climate change as an “emergency”, believe that it is impacting the weather, and say the country should be doing more to address it. 69% of Americans believe that the lives of future generations will be harmed by climate change. 61% of Americans say that extreme weather events in the United States over the past few years are related to climate change. 58% of Americans view climate change as an “emergency”. 58% of Americans say that the country isn’t doing enough to address climate change.

Poll: What Do Video Gamers Think About Global Warming?

Anthony Leiserowitz, Jennifer Carman, Marina Psaros, Liz Neyens, Seth Rosenthal, Jennifer Marlon and Malika Srivastava. Yale Program on Climate Change Communication
Research & Articles
08-31-2022

Americans who play video games are generally more personally concerned about climate change than the rest of the country, making them good targets for appeals to take action. About three in four video gamers (73%) think global warming is happening, and the majority of video gamers (56%) understand that global warming is mostly human-caused. These proportions are nearly identical to the proportions in the U.S. population overall, as measured in the Climate Change in the American Mind study conducted in April and May of 2022 (72% believe global warming is happening, 56% believe it is human-caused). Seven in ten video gamers (70%) say they are either “somewhat” or “very” worried about global warming, compared with 64% of the U.S. population overall. About half of video gamers are at least “moderately confident” that people from the gaming community, working together, can affect what local businesses (52%), corporations (52%), their state government (50%), the federal government (49%), or their local government (48%) does about global warming.