Resources

Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

RESULTS

Climate Health Master Class

Keystone Symposia and Global Consortium for Climate and Health Education
Research & Articles
06-03-2022

Climate change increases the incidence of practically all forms of human disease. This series of lectures features field leaders in various aspects of climate change and human health, focusing on how different types of extreme weather events and patterns cause both acute, and chronic, morbidities and mortality. Scientists, clinicians and public health policy experts to generate an integrated and comprehensive picture of health threats posed by climate change.

Research & Articles
05-20-2022

Air Pollution Leads as a Health and Safety Concern: More Americans are concerned about air pollution (57%) than other climate change hazards. 50% of the survey respondents say severe storms spark concern. Despite heat being a leading cause of weather-related deaths, only 37% of respondents are concerned about heatwaves. While floods are the second deadliest weather-related climate impact, only 33% of Americans report concern.

Research & Articles
04-20-2022

A significant majority of Gen Z youth (75% nationwide, 80% in California) have experienced a mental health-related issue, such as anxiety, stress, and/or feelings of being overwhelmed as a result of reading, seeing, or hearing news about climate change. 

  • Despite these mental health challenges, four out of five youths (81% nationwide, 86% in California) say they have personally taken action to respond to climate change.
  • Young people are stepping up to make a difference by relying less on plastic products (54% nationwide, 64% in California), reducing use of electricity (45% nationwide, 52% in California), and working to conserve water (38% nationwide, 53% in California). 
  • A vast majority of respondents (81% nationwide, 84% in California) agree that global leaders are not doing enough to combat climate change. 
  • Three quarters of youth (74% nationwide, 74% in California) say they agree that companies in the U.S. bear some responsibility to help people combat the impacts of climate change on their mental health.    
  • A majority (85% nationwide, 86% in California) believe it is important to support brands/companies that are sustainable and/or environmentally friendly. 

Poll: Americans Report Mental Health Effects of Climate Change, Worry About Future

Morning Consult for the American Psychiatric Association
Research & Articles
04-20-2022

58% of adults believe climate change is already impacting the health of Americans and nearly half (48%) agree that it’s impacting the mental health of Americans. Half of adults (51%) are anxious about climate change’s impact on future generations.

  • Adults are more were worried about the impact of climate change on the planet (55%) than on their mental health (39%). They were split on how news about climate change affected their mood, with 42% saying it affected them some or a lot, and 43% not much or not at all.
  • Young people were more anxious about climate change. Of those aged 18-34, 66% were anxious about its effect on the planet, 51% were worried about its impact on their mental health, and 59% worried about its impact on future generations. They were also more likely to believe it was already having an effect on the health (64%) and mental health (57%) of Americans.
  • White people were the least likely to report anxiety over the impact of climate change on the planet (52%) versus Hispanics (62%), Black people (65%) or people of other ethnicities (66%). Those in the northeast (57%) and western region (58%) of the country reported being more worried about the effect of climate change on the planet than those in the Midwest (50%) and the South (54%).

Poll: Majorities see California’s changing climate as serious health and safety threats

Mark DiCamillo, UC Berkeley Institute of Governmental Studies
Research & Articles
04-18-2022

Most California voters consider air pollution and extreme heat to be serious threats to the health and safety of their families; the majority also support the new state law requiring composting of all food waste. 64% of voters in the state say that extreme heat poses a “very” or “somewhat” serious threat to the health and safety of themselves and their family, and 63% say the same about air pollution. The poll also finds a great deal of support for the new California law requiring the composting of food waste in order to reduce pollution in landfills, with voters favoring the new policy by a 68%-24% margin.

Mental Health and Our Changing Climate: Impacts, Inequities, Responses

American Psychological Association, ecoAmerica
Research & Articles
11-03-2021

The American Psychological Association and ecoAmerica are pleased to offer this update of our 2017 report, Mental Health and Our Changing Climate. Since that report appeared, concerns about the mental health impacts of climate change have grown among health professionals, policymakers, and the public. Research on climate and health has accelerated and many new findings have emerged. With this update, we aim to provide readers with the information and guidance they need to stay current in this field and take effective action.

Research & Articles
09-18-2021

The Axios-Ipsos Hard Truths Environmental Racism poll finds that while all Americans are experiencing much the same climate-related challenges, minority Americans are much more likely to experience poor environmental conditions.  Along similar lines, Americans across the board report similar experiences with severe weather, but Black and Hispanic Americans are more likely to experience prolonged power outages or water safety issues.

Advocacy messages about climate and health are more effective when they include information about risks, solutions, and a normative appeal: Evidence from a conjoint experiment

John Kotcher, Lauren Feldman, Kate T. Luong, James Wyatt, Edward Maibach, George Mason University, Rutgers & Climate Nexus. The Journal of Climate Change and Health.
Research & Articles
07-31-2021

A good formula for leveraging health messaging for climate advocacy: Tell people about the health consequences of climate change, health benefits of climate solutions, and include a call-to-action. This experiment found that each of these categories was worth including in a message to help motivate Americans to contact Congress. Within each of these categories, a variety of specific types of information were tested, with the most effective overall combination being a message that first described the negative impacts of climate change on air quality, then explained how transitioning to clean energy will benefit people’s health, and ended by explaining that most Americans support this solution, and many are taking action to advocate for it.             

Tips & How-Tos
05-11-2021

To accelerate investments at the intersection of climate change, health, and equity, an online toolkit was developed that aims to help funders gain a sense of the complex and large landscape of issues and actors working at the intersection of these issues. The toolkit provides an overview and landscape of the issues, highlighting themes, profiles of foundations, nonprofits, and hubs of collaboration; and a library of resources made up of case studies, data, and practitioner guides.  

Although climate change is often portrayed as a polarizing issue, it is a significant concern for Americans, according to a Research!America survey. Well over half of those surveyed said that climate change is already harming their own health, and similar numbers believe climate change is harming the health of others in their household, of Americans in general, and of people around the world. Two-thirds believe climate change will harm their own health “a great deal” or “a moderate amount” in the next 10 years, and only 14% said they believed climate change would not harm their health or the health of their household at all in the next 10 years.