Resources

Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

RESULTS

Probable Futures

Probable Futures
Research & Articles
01-01-2024

This platform offers interactive maps, science, historical context, and stories to help us all envision a range of climate futures. This is an effort to enable and encourage people to have practical conversations and make informed decisions about the future in a changing climate. We seek to build bridges between cultures, organizations, technology, design, and science. This freely accessible platform was created so that everyone, everywhere in the world, can do the same.

Trust-building is actions aligned to values — it’s not just communicating about what matters, but doing it. Trust for institutions across society is declining. This growing trust deficit is a serious problem: It erodes a high-functioning pluralistic democracy, compromises public health and makes it impossible to solve collective problems like climate change. Trust doesn’t just happen. American civil society institutions have an important role to play in increasing trust — which is necessary to create the kind of world we all want to live in.

Anger Monitor 2.0

MindWorks
Research & Articles
01-01-2024

The Anger Monitor helps harness and redirect anger for positive impact. MindWorks measures the changing quality and quantity of anger to help advocates and organizers understand and leverage this emotion in campaigns. Anger can be destructive, often exploited by populists or extremists for their own agendas. However, it can also be constructive. Many historic social movements were built on anger.

Research & Articles
01-01-2024

Eco-anxiety is present for young Americans and young people around the world. Youth are turning this anxiety into activism. UK climate protesters went to prison after blocking roads and oil terminals. Just Stop Oil activists hurled soup at famous paintings. This guide describes other examples like these. (See pages 38-39 of the guide for the climate focus.)

Saving (for) the Planet

Project Drawdown
Research & Articles
01-01-2024

One of our greatest opportunities to advance climate solutions – leveraging the influence of our banking – has been hiding in plain sight. For the average person in the U.S., personal banking may constitute a large source of indirect greenhouse gas emissions. Every US$1,000 a person has in savings is roughly equivalent to the direct emissions generated by flying from New York to Seattle every year. Eleven of the largest U.S.-based banks lend around 19.4% on average – and as high as 30% – of their portfolios to carbon-intensive industries.

Research & Articles
01-01-2024

This website is a celebration of Just Infrastructure projects taking root as federal water dollars flow. It is also a storytelling resource for those pushing for equitable spending and future funding. For example, from urban greening in New Orleans and Chicago to drought preparedness in the San Joaquin Valley and the Navajo Nation, federal funding and local organizing are laying the groundwork for a just and resilient water future. The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and Inflation Reduction Act together include more than $60 billion for water projects.

Behind the scenes of Sunrise’s volunteer-led phone bank program

Sophia Zaia and Randall Smith, Sunrise Movement and PowerLabs
Research & Articles
01-01-2024

In the spring of 2020, Sunrise Movement had a goal of making 300,000 phonebank calls on six congressional primary races. Sunrise decided to create volunteer teams to manage other volunteers, liaise with campaigns, set goals, and develop strategy. The volunteer leaders of these teams took on a level of responsibility and autonomy typically reserved for staff. The team members took responsibility for setting goals, creating strategy and tactics, liaising with campaigns, and managing the work of thousands of other volunteers.

Research & Articles
01-01-2024

Entering 2024, certain narratives may be most prevalent in America. This report predicts those 2024 narratives, including the following six narratives. First, "war games": the U.S. will continue to chase global geopolitical dominance, centering values such as law and order, security, and the western world as the best. Second, "the planet keeps the score": we are on the edge of climate catastrophe, and the world as we know it may be ending. Third, "work": there has been a surge in worker power, but corporations will argue that they are the entities creating wealth and that unions are bad for the economy. Fourth, "bawdy": people, not the government, should be able to make decisions about their bodies, and while gender is expansive, men and women are biologically distinct. Fifth, debates about capitalism: some will argue that capitalism is dying, but others will argue it's the best system we have, and the role of government may be to intervene or stay out of the market economy. Sixth, "the ballot box": narratives surrounding elections may include the government is corrupt, the country is polarized, democracy is worth saving, or voting is ineffective.

Environmental Polling Roundup - December 15th, 2023

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
12-15-2023

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new polling about U.S. climate goals and policies, new polling on polluter accountability, new data from Yale + GMU’s “Global Warming's Six Americas” study, and new findings about young Americans and climate change in the 2024 election.

Poll: Concern for Climate Change Directly Informs Youth Civic Engagement

Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement at Tufts University
Research & Articles
12-14-2023

Young people who feel threatened by climate change and want government action are highly motivated to vote. Untapped potential among the 4 in 10 youth who believe in their ability to have influence on the climate issue: The largest group of youth identified in our analysis (40%) do not currently report being directly affected by climate change, but believe they have the ability to have influence on this issue. However, they are participating in civic actions (both on climate and other issues) at lower rates than other youth. These youth are more likely to be Black, from lower income households, and younger. A majority of youth (56%) do not identify as strongly Republican or strongly Democratic, and many are still undecided who they will vote for: Party affiliation and vote choice for two of the groups align with each of the two major parties. However, many unaffiliated youth were found across all groups, and in the two remaining groups that are not strongly Republican nor strongly Democratic, many youth are still undecided who they will vote for in the 2024 presidential election.