Resources

Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

RESULTS

Residents, community organizations, and health care practitioners organized for over a decade to protect the health of residents on the front lines of urban oil extraction in L.A. In January 2022, the Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously to draft an ordinance to prohibit all new oil and gas drilling and to phase out existing drilling operations throughout the City of Los Angeles. This resource is based on an interview with Wendy Miranda (she/they), a community leader with Communities for a Better Environment (CBE) and resident, about the historic victory. The organizing strategy to get this victory involved various lobbying efforts, rallies, press conferences, petition collections, a wide range of community/organization endorsements, phone banking, and social media outreach. Overall, frontline residents providing public comments and sharing their personal experiences were some of the strongest and most powerful tactics. STAND L.A. will continue to be part of the process to help draft an ordinance and direct the City of Los Angeles on how to lead a genuine community participation process. Miranda shares that this victory is proof that frontline communities can lead the change toward a just, equitable transition to a clean energy future.

Texas voters view the clean energy transition as a net positive for the state economy, and most want to see their state leadership strengthen regulations on utilities and fossil fuel companies. 65% of Texans agree that state leaders such as Governor Greg Abbott and Attorney General Ken Paxton didn’t do enough to protect consumers with high energy bills following Winter Storm Uri, and two-thirds (67%) believe that the federal government should investigate possible price gouging by power companies during the storm. Additionally, only 35% believe that the Texas state government is doing enough to prepare the state for the impacts of climate change. The clear majority (64%) support more regulations on power companies and oil and gas producers “given the disruptions to the power grid and high energy prices caused by Winter Storm Uri in February 2021.” And by a 56%-34% margin, Texans side more with an argument that “regulations on energy companies need to be stronger in Texas to ensure power stays on and to protect Texas consumers from high prices” than a competing argument that “regulations on energy companies are an overstep of the government, don’t usually deliver the benefits they promise, and are not worth the cost.” Importantly, the poll also finds that more Texans believe that the clean energy transition will improve Texas’s economy (47%) than worsen it (35%).

A Decade Of Successes Against Fossil Fuel Export Projects In Cascadia

Emily Moore, Fossil Fuels Transition. Sightline Institute
Research & Articles
05-31-2022

73% of initially planned oil, gas, and coal export projects in the region have been cancelled since 2012. Fossil fuel executives from dozens of companies once seemed to be salivating over the idea of exporting massive quantities of gas, oil, and coal from the Cascadia coast—but local communities, Tribes, environmentalists, and local governments rejected calls to turn Cascadia into a fossil fuel export terminal. They protested projects’ abrogation of Indigenous sovereignty, the risk of oil spills and damage to sensitive ecosystems, the pollution spewing from coal trains, the climate harms of extracting, transporting, and burning hydrocarbons, and the safety hazards of transporting flammable fuels through populated areas—and for the most part, they’ve won. Since 2012, fossil fuel interests have schemed more than 50 large projects to export coal, oil, gas, or their derivatives from Cascadia’s coast in British Columbia, Oregon, and Washington, and today, 40 of those—a whopping 73%—have been canceled by project backers who faced local opposition, see-sawing energy prices, and regulatory hurdles.

Poll: Spring 2022 Pennsylvania Climate and Energy Survey

Muhlenberg College Institute of Public Opinion & Sustainability Studies Program
Research & Articles
05-31-2022

A record-high percentage of Pennsylvanians (75%) say there is “solid evidence” of global warming; Pennsylvanians are divided on fracking and the long-term impacts of gas drilling in the state. 77% of Pennsylvanians view global warming as a “serious problem” (including 53% who rate it as “very serious”) further demonstrates a clear statewide consensus around the reality and risks of climate change. The poll also finds that Pennsylvanians are feeling cross-pressured on the issue of fracked gas, as large majorities believe both that gas drilling is important to the state’s economy (86%) and that it poses a major risk to the state’s water resources (67%). Pennsylvanians are divided on fracking in general, as 48% support and 44% oppose the extraction of gas from shale deposits in the state. State residents have similarly mixed attitudes as to whether gas drilling will provide more benefits (44%) or more problems (40%) for Pennsylvania in the future. When asked an open-ended question about the primary risks of fracking in Pennsylvania, meanwhile, residents are most likely to name water contamination (26%) and general environmental damage (14%).

10 Recommendations on How to Campaign on Energy When Everybody Is Thinking about War

Stefan Flothmann and Ieva Rozentāle, Mindworks Lab. Medium
Research & Articles
05-25-2022

This resource proposes 10 recommendations for campaigners to strengthen their energy advocacy. These are rooted in 4 future scenarios of how public perceptions and mindsets around energy independence could evolve in the coming months. Recommendations include: Engage people in developing an energy-saving plan to become less dependent on Russian imports. Make the objectives in your plan tangible by adding numbers to them. Aim to unite people behind some ideas supported by majorities. Congratulate the effort and sacrifice. Showcase or create visible innovators and early movers. Gradually raise the bar and establish the new standards as normal even before they become law. Connect the new norms to new or old identities. Make the best use of the efforts of various research organisations to study the changes in public opinion. Be extremely sensitive and listen to any narrative of injustice that evolves. Be mindful and vigilant in your response to divisive forces.

California voters lean toward keeping nuclear energy in the state’s power mix, while their support for natural gas has declined. The poll encouragingly finds that voters overwhelmingly approve of solar (91% approve, including 73% who say they “definitely” approve of it) and wind (81% approve, including 67% who “definitely” approve of it) being used as electricity sources for the state. A clear majority also approve of natural gas as an electricity source (71% approve), though with considerably less enthusiasm (40% “definitely” approve) than they feel about solar and wind. Californians are relatively more split in their feelings about nuclear power, but over half approve of it being included in the state’s energy mix (54% approve / 36% disapprove). The poll release also includes time-series trend data from 2013 for comparison. This trend data shows that, over the past nine years, Californians’ approval of nuclear (51% to 54%, +3) and solar (94% to 91%, -3) has barely budged, while there’s been a dip in approval of wind power (92% to 84%, -8) and a more sizable drop in approval of natural gas (89% to 71%, -18).

Poll: Massachusetts Voters Want More Clean Energy

Global Strategy Group for Barr Foundation
Research & Articles
05-15-2022

A survey of 600 registered voters in Massachusetts showed voters remain concerned about climate change and optimistic about renewable energy. 

Research & Articles
05-11-2022

Americans continue to favor the development of renewable energy over expanding fossil fuels, but GOP support for fossil fuels is rising. Americans still widely prioritize developing alternative energy sources such as wind, solar, and hydrogen technology (67%) over expanding exploration and production of oil, coal and natural gas (32%). Americans favored clean energy over fossil fuels by a commanding 79%-20% margin during Trump’s last year in office (May 2020), but this margin dipped to 71%-27% soon after Biden took office (April 2020) and has continued to decline incrementally since (to 69%-30% in January 2022 and 67%-32% in this latest poll). Self-identified Republicans’ attitudes have shifted dramatically in the last two years: Republicans said they wanted to prioritize clean energy over fossil fuels by a 30-point margin in May 2020 (65%-35%), and now in May 2022 they say they want to prioritize fossil fuels over clean energy by an 18-point margin (59%-41%). This poll asked other questions, too.

Massachusetts residents are concerned about the impacts of climate change, with majorities saying that climate impacts like heat waves, coastal flooding and more powerful storms are already or very likely to hit the state in the next five years. However fewer than half of residents (47%) list climate change as a high priority -- it trails behind worries about health care, jobs and the economy, education, taxes, and fuel costs. The new survey suggests concern over climate change has declined since a similar poll in 2019 in which 54% of residents called climate change a high priority for state government. 

Majorities of MA residents support climate and energy policies including:

  • Update the states' building codes to require buildings to be better protected against climate change (76%)
  • Require new or renvoated buildings to be ready to charge electric vehicles (70%)
  • Require new or renovated buildings to be fully electric, using no oil or natural gas (57%)

Additional analysis and data visualizations in this article from WBUR

Fighting Off a Petrochemical Future in the Ohio River Valley

Dharna Noor and Nicole Fabricant. Yes! Magazine
Research & Articles
04-11-2022

Help people envision more just and sustainable systems. This article looks at efforts in southwest Pennsylvania to oppose plans for gas and plastics expansion in the region. Activists share their strategies, including raising public awareness about the dangers of fracking and plastic, tracking emissions themselves, and advocating for investments in more sustainable industries.