Resources

Search below for resources covering the intersection of climate engagement, social science and data analytics.

RESULTS

Research & Articles
02-02-2024

Voters widely support “responsible investing” rules from the SEC that require businesses to disclose climate-related financial risks. Few are hearing negative information about ESG. Just over seven in ten voters (71%) – including majorities of Democrats (80%), independents (69%), and Republicans (64%) – say that they support “responsible investing” based on the description below. Majorities also support the proposed SEC rule to require disclosure of climate-related financial risks when they learn about the rule.

Environmental Polling Roundup - February 2nd, 2024

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
02-02-2024

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including new polling on climate attitudes across generations and new polling on Americans’ top issue priorities.

Notable research of 2023

Justin Rolfe- Redding, Climate Advocacy Lab
Research & Articles
02-01-2024

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The 100 most common words appearing in the 2023 research resources we highlight below.

Inflation Reduction Act

Annual Presentation

Nat Bullard
Research & Articles
01-31-2024

This resource includes very comprehensive visual descriptions of climate science and clean energy. Nat Bullard’s annual presentation covers the state of decarbonization told with climate, capital markets, technology, and sector data. A coherent view of the future begins with the clearest possible view of the present. This webpage includes 2024 and 2023 presentations.

Gen Z and Millennials both outpace other generations in their climate concern. Majorities of every generation say that they’re at least “somewhat” concerned about climate change, including overwhelming majorities of Gen Z Americans (85%) and Millennials (78%) as well as around three in five Gen X Americans (60%), Baby Boomers (59%), and Americans from the Silent/Greatest generations (63%).

Environmental Polling Roundup - January 26th, 2024

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
01-26-2024

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including a new update of Yale’s Climate Opinion Maps with estimates of climate attitudes down to local geographies, new polling on Americans’ top issue concerns, and new polling on the electricity grid and clean energy transition.

Research & Articles
01-25-2024

Americans are widely concerned about aging and unreliable electric grid infrastructure. Grid reliability, along with health and jobs, is a key argument in favor of transitioning to clean energy.

Yale Climate Opinion Maps 2023

Jennifer Marlon, Emily Goddard, Peter Howe, et al. Yale Program on Climate Change Communication
Research & Articles
01-23-2024

New Yale Climate Opinion Maps provide updated estimates of Americans’ climate attitudes down to the state, county, metro area, and congressional district levels. While most polling on climate attitudes is conducted at either the national or state levels, Yale’s Climate Opinion Maps utilize national polling data to estimate public attitudes down to smaller geographies – providing advocates with a unique set of data to hold policymakers at various levels of government accountable.

Environmental Polling Roundup - January 19th, 2024

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
01-19-2024

This post includes climate and environment headlines, data points, and key takeaways from recent public polls - including a new analysis of the impact of voters’ climate attitudes on the 2020 presidential election results, new polling on electric vehicles, new polling on competitiveness with China on clean energy, and a new analysis of climate justice attitudes across Yale and George Mason’s “Six Americas” segments.

On Climate Disinformation

Apollo Gonzales, Climate Advocacy Lab
Research & Articles
01-18-2024

Freezing temperatures and skyrocketing energy costs are knocking on our doors again in Texas, and conversations about reliable renewable energy projects are once again emerging. This has us thinking quite a bit this week about what stands in the way of siting and building renewable projects that are now well funded, thanks to the Inflation Reduction Act. Inevitably we return to the conversation about the role of misinformation.