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Environmental Polling Roundup - August 27th, 2021

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
08-27-2021

This post includes a roundup of climate + environment headlines from this week’s public polls, good data points to highlight, and a full roundup including key takeaways from each poll.

HEADLINES

  • Climate Power + Data for Progress - Voters in moderate U.S. House budget holdouts’ home districts want clean energy and climate investments on top of the infrastructure bill (Release, Topline)
  • POLITICO/Morning Consult - Climate ranks at the top of Democratic voters’ legislative priorities, and there is little backlash to the infrastructure bill (Crosstabs)
  • Navigator - With awareness of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework low, providing basic details still significantly boosts support with all constituencies (Topline)
  • Economist/YouGov - Rising sea levels, extreme heat, and drought continue to be the most widely accepted examples of climate affecting weather today (Topline, Crosstabs)
  • Yale Program on Climate Change Communication - Hot, dry days are more likely to affect Americans’ climate change beliefs than other types of extreme weather (Article, Published Study)
  • Quinnipiac - Half of Floridians think that climate change will negatively impact the state in their lifetimes (Release)

Environmental Polling Roundup - August 23rd, 2021

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
08-23-2021

This post includes a roundup of climate + environment headlines from this week’s public polls, good data points to highlight, and a full roundup including key takeaways from each poll.

HEADLINES

  • YouGov - Partisanship drives Americans’ perceptions of weather (Article)
  • Navigator - The Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework remains popular (ReleaseSlide Deck)
  • POLITICO/Morning Consult - Renewable energy investment ranks among the most popular provisions in the Build Back Better budget; infrastructure has the public’s attention, but the IPCC report hasn’t broken through (Crosstabs)
  • Data for Progress + Invest in America - Grid modernization is an overwhelmingly popular selling point for the Build Back Better budget (ReleaseTopline)
  • Data for Progress - Voters widely support corporate climate accountability along the lines of the Polluters Pay Climate Fund Act (MemoTopline)

Research & Articles
08-12-2021

A June 2021 poll found that 57% of Montana voters support the Biden Administration’s American Jobs Plan creating a national path to achieving 100 percent clean electricity by 2035. However, the support is very polarized: 95% of Democrats said they’re supportive, along with 53% of Independents, but just 32% of Republicans. Voters showed similar levels of support when asked about green investments, jobs, and consumer incentives associated with the American Jobs Plan.             


Research & Articles
08-11-2021

Key Takeaways:

  • The large majority of voters respond favorably to the Build Back Better reconciliation bill when its main elements (including the cost and tax provisions) are presented to them.

  • Most voters say that climate change is responsible for extreme weather events and there is strong majority support for action on climate change. Voters say they are more likely to support the Build Back Better package because of its provisions on clean energy, climate change, and environmental justice.

  • The provisions of the package that lower costs for working families and seniors, including energy costs, are important to swing voters and offer a winning response to criticisms that the Build Back Better package will fuel inflation.

  • There also is a winning rebuttal to the “tax-and-spend” criticism of the package, focusing on the facts that (a) the legislation would be paid for by making the wealthy and multinational corporations pay their fair share; (b) no one under $400,000 will pay more in taxes; and (c) the long-term benefits will outweigh the costs because the proposed investments will grow the economy, create jobs, and help tackle climate change.

 

(This poll was collected by the Environmental Polling Consortium. If you would like to learn more about the EPC and receive weekly polling insights, please contact epc@partnershipproject.org)


Environmental Polling Roundup - August 6th, 2021

David Gold, Environmental Polling Consortium
Research & Articles
08-06-2021

This post includes a roundup of climate + environment headlines from this week’s public polls, good data points to highlight, and a full roundup including key takeaways from each poll.

HEADLINES

  • Climate Power + LCV - Investments in clean energy, climate action, and environmental justice bolster support for the reconciliation bill; the most persuasive messages focus on economic aspects including how the bill will lower costs for households (Slide Deck)
  • Climate Power + Data for Progress - Voters support a range of climate-related proposals that were left out of the bipartisan infrastructure bill, especially clean electricity incentives, investments in energy efficiency, and investments in solar and wind (ReleaseMemoTopline)
  • POLITICO + Morning Consult - Voters continue to back the bipartisan infrastructure bill, especially investments in roads, bridges, and water infrastructure; voters are more split on the reconciliation package, but overwhelmingly support expanded home care for the elderly and disabled (ToplineCrosstabs)
  • Data for Progress - Voters think that oil and gas companies have too much power, especially after learning about comments made by a senior Exxon lobbyist; “oil and gas companies” are a more compelling villain than “fossil fuel companies” (ReleaseTopline)
  • Yale Program on Climate Change Communication + George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication - Petition signing is the most appealing ask to get voters involved in climate advocacy, and there is clear interest in community preparedness groups (SummaryFull Report)

Key Takeaways:

  • Seven in ten say climate change is a major crisis or problem.
  • Nearly half of Americans say their community's weather this summer differs from that of past summers, including hotter weather caused by climate change.
  • A rebuttal focused on the daily impacts felt from climate change is more effective than focusing on casualties and extreme weather when responding to those who say we shouldn't invest in tackling climate change.

Links: ArticleSlide Deck, & Full Topline

(This poll was collected by the Environmental Polling Consortium. If you would like to learn more about the EPC and receive weekly polling insights, please contact epc@partnershipproject.org)


Tips & How-Tos
08-04-2021

This tipsheet covers six principles to help organizations interested in developing and implementing a relational organizing strategy. These tips include:

  • Relationships are key to keeping people engaged and ready to take action
  • Developing a relational organizing strategy takes time
  • A variety of relational organizing approaches is the spice of life!
  • Relational organizing is power-building
  • 1-on-1s are about creating long-lasting, transformative relationships
  • Relational organizing and cultural organizing can be very effective together

Oil and Gas Companies Have Too Much Power

Jason Katz-Brown and Danielle Deiseroth, Data for Progress.
Research & Articles
08-03-2021

Many Americans believe that the oil and gas industry has too much power and influence in Washington, with support coming from both sides of the aisle. Two-thirds (67%) of Democrats believe the industry has too much power, while 39% of Republicans agree that they have too much power. When presented with quotes from an Exxon lobbyist that highlights the influence Exxon has in the capital, however, these percentages increase to 74% and 48% respectively. Finally, this research finds that when “oil and gas companies” is used, rather than “fossil fuel companies,” the percentage who believe that the industry has too much power increases. Advocates interested in highlighting these finding should consider focusing on the bipartisan distrust in the oil and industry, and use “oil and gas” language rather than “fossil fuel” language.             


Advocacy messages about climate and health are more effective when they include information about risks, solutions, and a normative appeal: Evidence from a conjoint experiment

John Kotcher, Lauren Feldman, Kate T. Luong, James Wyatt, Edward Maibach, George Mason University, Rutgers & Climate Nexus. The Journal of Climate Change and Health.
Research & Articles
08-01-2021

A good formula for leveraging health messaging for climate advocacy: Tell people about the health consequences of climate change, health benefits of climate solutions, and include a call-to-action. This experiment found that each of these categories was worth including in a message to help motivate Americans to contact Congress. Within each of these categories, a variety of specific types of information were tested, with the most effective overall combination being a message that first described the negative impacts of climate change on air quality, then explained how transitioning to clean energy will benefit people’s health, and ended by explaining that most Americans support this solution, and many are taking action to advocate for it.             


The One-on-One

Alex Riccio, International Workers of the World. The Forge.
Tips & How-Tos
07-27-2021

There are six key steps to executing the best “one-on-one” conversation—specific to a union organizing setting, but potentially applicable to other settings. Step One: Discover the issues—ask open-ended questions to understand the problems the worker cares most about. Step Two: Agitate—ask provocative questions about the frustrations expressed by the worker. Step Three: Elucidate—provide your worker with alternatives, such as enhancing worker power with a union. Step Four: Make an “ask”—before assuming you will be rejected, ask the worker to take a concrete action. Step Five: Innoculate—prepare the worker for the toxic arguments that the boss will give in fighting union power. Step Six: Follow up—check in after the conversation to try to ensure consistent communication and action.